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Thursday, 05 January 2012 12:51

Ivy Bridge faces yield issues

Written by Fuad Abazovic



Getting better for April launch


Several sources close to the motherboard and notebook industries are telling us that Ivy Bridge was delayed for a few months due to yield issues. It was evident that Ivy Bridge would launch later than Sandy Bridge by roughly a quarter and now we know why.

Our sources claim that yields at 22nm are not as great as Intel had hoped for and this is the main reason behind the delay. Sandy Bridge, Intel’s 32nm second generation Core architecture launched at CES 2011 in January 2011, but most parts started shipping in early February.

This time around the launch is expected in the second week of April, and the current launch date, that is not carved in stone is April 8th, a whole quarter behind the last launch. It looks like 22nm transition and 3D transistors are not easy as Intel wanted us to believe. It’s been a while since Intel had any manufacturing issues but in the last few years tick-tock delayed Intel’s product introduction from traditional Q4 launches to Q2 of next year, extending its launch cycle. 

Our sources claim that the usual practice would be to see the announcement in January around CES and start selling systems and motherboards early next month. Z77 and a mobile version of a chipset including QS77, QM77 and three versions of HM7x chipsets are reportedly already ready to ship.

Since for the most part Ivy Bridge will compete with Intel’s own with its second generation Core parts, it’s not a big deal for the company, but this slight delay will give AMD more breathing room and help its recovery.

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Comments  

 
+4 #1 robert3892 2012-01-05 12:57
Luckily Intel is in no hurry as it faces no serious competition at this time. I doubt if AMD can step in and take any market share during the delay.
 
 
+4 #2 Zone 2012-01-05 14:01
Quoting robert3892:
Luckily Intel is in no hurry as it faces no serious competition at this time. I doubt if AMD can step in and take any market share during the delay.


Ermm why do you say "luckily" in that sentence?
Having yield issues and not feeling pressure to do something about it is a good thing in your book?
I want Ivy bridge up and running preferably as soon as possible thank you very much.
 
 
+3 #3 Nubstick 2012-01-05 17:50
Just goes to show you that no one is immune to the ever increasing complexity of these processes.

TSMC's 40nm was late, 28nm late
GF's 32nm suffered (still suffering?) yield problems.
And now Intel's 22nm yield problems, even though they would never admit it themselves.
 
 
+4 #4 nECrO 2012-01-05 17:54
Quoting Nubstick:
Just goes to show you that no one is immune to the ever increasing complexity of these processes.

TSMC's 40nm was late, 28nm late
GF's 32nm suffered (still suffering?) yield problems.
And now Intel's 22nm yield problems, even though they would never admit it themselves.







Bingo. Give the man a cigar. It's nice to see someone understands the physics and the massive challenges of each shrink. It was getting old seeing ppl post this or that company sucks because they are having issues at a given die shrink.
 
 
+1 #5 Bl0bb3r 2012-01-06 03:34
It's just the start of the end of silicon... probably no one predicted that the closer they got to the end the more costly it would get. All though they would just advance until that limiting wall was hit. Dumb.

Anyway, G-FET... we are awaiting you, pick up the pace please.
 
 
0 #6 spp 2012-01-08 13:00
Wow even Intel have yield problems!
 

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