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Friday, 13 January 2012 11:53

Big Content hassles the press

Written by Nick Farell



Write what we want or face the music


Big Content that it has governments in the US and Spain doing what they are told, the MPAA is now confident enough to give the media a dressing down.

Writing in its Bog, the MPAA named and shamed a magazine which its limited research called "Arts Technica."  It described it as a tech blog with a long history of challenging efforts to curb content theft. But while the MPAA seems to have singled out Ars Technica what is behind the slagging off is somewhat nasty.

MPAA is miffed that the magazine opposed its attempts to gain 'broadcast flag' control over people's digital devices and it tends to call what it does to the internet censorship. But the MPAA seems to have actually gone for the throat of Julian Sanchez, the former Ars editor.

Sanchez is guilty of committing a serious act of journalism when he proved that the MPAA was picking figures out of its bottom with its central anti-piracy figures. So basically the MPAA is attacking Ars Technica hacks for doing its job and not letting it get away with lying to punters.

Nick Farell

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