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Tuesday, 17 January 2012 09:26

Linux is getting too big

Written by Nick Farell



Torvalds is getting worried


Linus Torvalds is getting a little worried about the size of the  Linux kernel source code.

In the last three years or so the source code size has grown by 50-percent and the latest version is more than 15 million lines long. Linux started with 10,000 lines of code, and version 1.0.0 grew to 176,250 lines by March 1994. Less than ten years ago Linux 2.4 had about 2.4 million lines of code.

Chatting to the German newspaper Zeit Online, which we get for its acne news, Torvalds moaned that Linux has become "too complex." He was worried that developers will not be able to find their way through the software. Even subsystems have become very complex and it is heading towards the point where an error that "cannot be evaluated anymore."

More than three quarters of the Linux kernel code are drivers, file systems and architecture-specific code, while there are plenty of comments and blank lines as well.






Nick Farell

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