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Friday, 21 March 2008 13:18

Scythe officially launches the Orochi

Written by Slobodan Simic

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1,155g heavy with ten heatpipes

 


Scythe has officially launched what is possibly the largest CPU cooler ever, the Orochi. This new cooler features ten heatpipes and weighs 1,155g, and that's without a fan.

The dimensions of this cooling behemoth from Scythe are 120 x 194 x 155mm, which makes it unsuitable for many PC cases, so Scythe has an important notice stating that you should check the dimensions of your PC case before buying this cooler.

It doesn't stop there, because Scythe is shipping this cooler with a fan, although this cooler shouldn't have any problems cooling most CPUs without adding a fan. If you are going for some serious cooling then add another 130g with a 140mm low noise fan that gives 29.39CFM of airflow as it spins at 500RPM.

Scythe's Orochi can be mounted on Intel's socket 478 and LGA 775 processors, as well as AMD's socket 754, 939, 940 and AM2 processors. It just looks impressive, ten 6mm heatpipes going through a large heatsink sounds like overkill, but from Scythe's point of view, size does matter.

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Last modified on Monday, 24 March 2008 05:47

Slobodan Simic

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