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Thursday, 16 February 2012 11:55

Nomophobia sweeps UK

Written by Nick Farrell



Brits can't cope with mobile isolation


Two thirds of British people suffer from a condition known as nomophobia according to a recent survey. First identified in 2008, nomophobia is the fear of being out of mobile phone contact.

A recent survey of 1,000 people in employment, conducted using OnePoll, discovered two thirds of respondents fear losing or being without their mobile phone. The study, sponsored by SecurEnvoy showed that reveals that 41 per cent of people interviewed, in an effort to stay connected, have two phones or more. When asked if they’d be upset if a partner looked at the messages and texts on their phone almost half said that they would.

Women worry about losing their phones than men.  More than  70 per cent of the women surveyed compared to 61 per cent of men feared losing their phone. Men were more likely to have two phones and make an effort to stay connected. When split by age it is the younger people were more nomophobic at 77 per cent while among older users only a third are nomophobic.

The first study into nomophobia, conducted four years ago, revealed that 53 per cent of people suffered from the condition and our study reveals this has now risen to 66 per cent in the UK and shows no sign of abating, the study said,
The only difference between that study and 2008 is that it was men that were more afflicted yet today it’s women.

Nick Farrell

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