Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 05 March 2012 12:41

UK court throws out Google libel

Written by Nick Farrell



No jurisdiction


The UK High Court has thrown out a libel action being brought against Google over comments posted on a blog on the grounds that there was no jurisdiction to try the claim.

Former Conservative councillor Payam Tamiz launched his complaint after allegedly defamatory comments were posted on a blog written about him. Google contended that it was not a publisher for the purposes of the English law of defamation and therefore there were no grounds to bring the claim.

Mr Justice Eady agreed saying that Google was not regarded by the court as a publisher under the established principles of the common law. Google claimed that it had no way of knowing whether the comments complained of were true or not and that it could not be reasonably be expected to investigate and determine the truth or falsity of allegations made by bloggers.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments