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Monday, 05 March 2012 12:49

Broadwell 2014 CPU fits Lynx Point chipset

Written by Fuad Abazovic



14nm to use same 1150 socket as Haswell


Good news everyone. Intel is sticking to socket 1150 for the whole of 2013 and 2014, probably even a small part of 2015.

This is a desktop socket compatible with Lynx Point chipset, something that comes up next year with Haswell platform and the socket of choice is called LGA 1150. Intel is about to launch its Ivy Bridge 22nm processors and 7 series chipset in April, and they are using the LGA 1155 socket, the same as 6 series chipset from Sandy Bridge.

There is at least two year expiry date with Intel sockets with an expectation that 7-series chipsets bring some new features that are absent from Ivy Bridge/6-series chipset combination. Just to set the record straight, Ivy Bridge desktop and 6-series chipset will work.

Broadwell is a 14nm CPU set to come after Haswell so you can say some two years from now. Just to state the obvious, it should show its face in first half of 2014, unless Intel faces some serious delays in transition from 22nm to 14nm.

If all goes well by 1H of 2016, some four years from today, you should be able to buy your first 10 nm processor from Intel. Sounds small considering that 28nm from TSMC gets everyone super excited and it 28nm chips are starting to roll out as we speak.

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