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Wednesday, 07 March 2012 13:17

Civil rights experts wade into McCain

Written by Nick Farrell



Cybersecurity bill is dire


A US cybersecurity bill introduced by Republican Senator John McCain could dramatically expand the domestic reach of US spooks and give them shedloads of emails, civil liberties advocates have warned.

Michelle Richardson of the American Civil Liberties Union said the law was a privacy nightmare that will eventually result in the military substantially monitoring the domestic, civilian Internet. Unlike the Democratic-led alternative supported by Majority Leader Harry Reid, the McCain bill talks about voluntary information sharing instead of regulation by the Department of Homeland Security.

Richardson told Reuters that the types of information that could be shared are broad, and the data would go to "cybersecurity centres" that specifically include the National Security Agency's Threat Operations Center and the US Cyber Command Joint Operations Centre.

In otherwords people would be volunteering for Big Brother rather than having it imposed on them.

Nick Farrell

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