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Monday, 19 March 2012 14:01

Facebook linked to socially aggressive narcissism

Written by Nedim Hadzic

facebook

Study surely shouldn’t have taken long

In the wave of latest studies linking social networking to narcissism, a psychology paper claims to have found a link between Facebook and the likes and socially disruptive narcissism.

Apparently, there is a direct link between the number of friends on Facebook and the extent of socially disruptive narcissism. The paper claims such persons tag themselves and update newsfeeds more often. It seems to confirm the fears that youth is becoming obsessed with self-image and shallow friendships.

The study group numbered 294 participants, aged from 18 to 65 and measured two elements of narcissism - grandiose exhibitionism (GE) and entitlement/exploitativeness (EE). GE includes 'self-absorption, vanity, superiority, and exhibitionistic tendencies whereas EE includes a sense of deserving respect and a willingness to manipulate and take advantage of others.

It just so turned out that the higher the subject scored on GE, the more friends he had on Facebook. Those scoring highly on both EE and GG were more likely to accept friend requests and seek social support, although they were less likely to provide it.

Chief executive of the Centre for Confidence and Well-being Carol Craig said that Facebook provided a platform for the disorder. She added that children are "focusing more and more on the importance of self esteem – on how you are seen in the eyes of others.

More here.



Last modified on Monday, 19 March 2012 14:46

Nedim Hadzic

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