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Tuesday, 20 March 2012 09:04

Seagate hits 1 Terabit per square inch milestone

Written by Nedim Hadzic

seagate

3.5’’ drives to soar to 60TB in next 10 years

Seagate has announced its latest storage milestone. The company achieved storage density of 1 terabit per square inch.

This achievement promises to double the storage of current hard drives when it’s introduced later in the decade. The company claims it will allow for 3.5-inch hard drives of up to 60 terabytes, all in the next 10 years.

For its milestone, Seagate used the next-gen recording technology heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR). It is expected to succeed the current Perpendicular Magnetic Recording (PMR) tech, which was introduced in 2006 and expected to hit its 1TB per square cap in the next few years.

Current 3.5-inch drives are capable of about 620 gigabits per square inch whereas 2.5-inch drives manage 500 gigabits per square inch. Being just over 1 terabit per square inch, the first generation of HAMR drives should already double the capacities.

While we’re not the ones to ruin anyone’s milestone, we’re still more interested in immediate benefits for users, such as price drops of existing HDDs, as primitive as they may seem now.


Last modified on Tuesday, 20 March 2012 10:06
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