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Tuesday, 10 April 2012 13:53

British PM claims coalition partners back Internet monitoring

Written by Nick Farrell



How to embarrass you partners


British Prime Minister David Cameron insists that his coalition partners, the Liberal Democrats back plans to monitor internet communications

The Lib-dems have always been against such violations of privacy. However Cameron insists that Lib-Dem leader Nick Clegg was "round the table" when controversial plans were drawn up although he might have popped out for coffee.

This might explain why there is shedloads of anger about the proposals from Liberal Democrats.  Although there is a lot of opposition from his own party about the "snoopers' charter." He said that those who disagree with him should be "patient" until they see the final version. After all it is pointless getting angry about something small that is about to be changed, when you can save all your anger for something that will get you cross later.
He also urged against rushing to condemn plans to extend courts' ability to hear evidence in secret.  After all there are lots of countries that jail people in secret and this is nothing to worry about.

Cameron insisted that no one is talking about changing the rules and snooping into the content of somebody's telephone calls or emails, and a warrant would still be needed, signed by the home secretary. Of course the fact that it has to be signed by a politician and not a judge is nothing to worry about.  Even if these were the same people who signed off their duck ponds on expenses.

Nick Farrell

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