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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 09 April 2008 10:11

ID thieves lower prices

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Hard competition


There
is so much competition between ID thieves that the cost of stolen data has plummeted.

According to a Symantec report on Internet security threats, credit card numbers were being flogged for 40 cents each and access to a bank account was going for $10 in the second half of 2007. There were more than 711,912 new threats last year in comparison to 2006, when 125,243 were catalogued.

Stolen data is flogged through instant-message groups or Web forums that exist for only a few days or even hours. In some cases, stolen credit card numbers were sold in batches of 500 for a total of $200, which was half the price that the same data would be sold for in the first half of 2007.

A full identitiy, with a functioning credit card number, Social Security number and a person's name, address and date of birth, will set you back $100 for 50, or $2 apiece.

EU IDs are worth 50 per cent more than U.S. identities because they can be used in multiple countries.
Last modified on Wednesday, 09 April 2008 18:49

Nick Farell

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