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Friday, 27 April 2012 11:00

Globalfoundaries moves to 3D stacked 20nm chips

Written by Nick Farrell



Following Intel


GlobalFoundries has announced that it has installed speciality production tools at its New York plant capable of 3D stacking 20nm chips.

The tools help the company to create Through-Silicon Vias (TSVs), which allows customers to stack multiple chips on top of each other. Basically the technology will allow manufacturers to stack memory chips right on top of the processor, which would drastically improve performance and lead to reduced power consumption.

Gregg Bartlett, chief technology officer of GlobalFoundries, said the technology can deliver cost and time savings, and reduce technical risk associated with developing new technologies. The technology is seen as the next logical progression for manufacturers instead of simply scaling upwards at the transistor level.

While it is logical, it is the same method used by Intel on the current Ivy Bridge processors which cuts power consumption by around 20 per cent, while allowing performance improvements.

Nick Farrell

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