Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 21 May 2012 12:19

Boffins work out way for super fast ReRAM

Written by Nick Farrell



Built from pure silicon oxide


Boffins at UCL have developed the first purely silicon oxide based resistive ram (ReRAM) memory chip. The chip can operate in ambient conditions and could be the next thing for super fast memory.

ReRAM memory chips are based on materials whose electrical resistance changes when a voltage is applied, so they can retain data without power. These chips promise significantly greater storage capacity than current technology with less energy and space. Dr Tony Kenyon, UCL electronic and electrical engineering said that his ReRAM memory chips need just a thousandth of the energy and are around a hundred times faster than standard flash memory chips.

The fact that the device can operate in ambient conditions and has a continuously variable resistance opens up a huge range of potential applications. Unlike other silicon oxide chips in development, the team says its devices do not require a vacuum to work and are therefore potentially cheaper and more durable.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments