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Wednesday, 23 May 2012 12:58

Insecurity expert cracks SecureID

Written by Nick Farrell



Creates secret SecureID


A researcher has come up with a technique that clones the secret software token that RSA's SecurID uses to generate one-time passwords.

Sensepost senior security analyst  Behrang Fouladi said that the discovery has important implications for the safekeeping of the tokens. Fouladi demonstrated another way determined attackers could circumvent protections built into SecurID. By reverse engineering software used to manage the cryptographic software tokens on computers running Windows, he found that the secret "seed" was easy for people with control over the machines to locate and copy. He provided step-by-step instructions for others to follow in order to demonstrate how easy it is to create clones that mimic verbatim the output of a targeted SecurID token.

He said that once this has been done a hacker should have successfully cloned the victim's software token and if they run the SecurID software token program on your computer, it will generate the exact same random numbers that are displayed on the victim's token. Then it is goodnight Vienna.

Nick Farrell

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