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Thursday, 24 May 2012 14:41

Apple will fight for the right to screw over customers

Written by Nick Farrell



Ebook cartel was good for them


Jobs' Mob has announced that it will fight for its right to run a cartel which jacked up the price of ebooks for its customers.

Jobs himself bragged in his biography that the deal negotiated with the publishing houses would lead to users paying more. However Apple is now rejecting charges that it conspired to fix prices of electronic books, calling the U.S. government's antitrust lawsuit a "fundamentally flawed."

In a filing in U.S. District Court in Manhattan late Tuesday, Apple said it has not conspired with anyone or fixed prices for e-books in an effort to thwart Amazon.com dominance of the market. The Justice Department said Apple colluded with five big publishers to force up e-book prices in early 2010, Apple launched its keyboardless netbook.

Amazon, which makes the Kindle e-reader, sold e-books for as little as $9.99. Jobs wanted to offer publishers a means to boost prices, and "create a real mainstream e-books market at $12.99 and $14.99." Apple argues that since it created its glorious tablet it had  fuelled demand for e-books by forcing Amazon and rivals, including Barnes & Noble, to compete more aggressively.

Nick Farrell

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