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Friday, 01 June 2012 13:09

Rare Apple computer up for auction

Written by Nick Farrell

apple

It didn't catch fire or get broken

Auction house Sotheby's auction has offered up an exceptionally rare Apple 1 computer.

The computer is one of just 200 and was the first ever batch of computers ever produced by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976. For those who came in late, Apple once used to make computers before becoming one of the world's leading toymakers.

Steve Wozniak will appear in person at the auction. It is expected that the rare machines sold for somewhere in the region of $120,000 to £180,000, which means that they have held their value.

The Apple 1 was dismissed by everyone except Paul Terrell, the owner of a chain of stores called Byte Shop, who ordered 50 for $500 each which he then offered to the public for $666. Of course, everyone knows is the number of the anti-Christ.

Terrell insisted that the circuit boards come fully assembled rather than as kits, so Wozniak built the 50 in just 30 days. When these were complete, they continued working and produced a further 150 which they sold to mates and other vendors for the retail price.


Nick Farrell

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