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Friday, 01 June 2012 13:41

Nokia snaps back at Google

Written by Nedim Hadzic

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Android phones have major patent issues

Following Google’s accusations that Nokia was scheming with Microsoft when it comes to intellectual property, Nokia responded by good old tactics of shifting attention to patent issues on Android devices. That is after Microsoft said that Google's complaint was a desperate tactic from someone who controls more than 95 percent of mobile search and advertising cake.

Nokia’s spokesperson Mark Durrant said that although the company hasn’t seen the complaint over its “colluding on intellectual property” with Microsoft, it is still wrong. He said Nokia and Microsoft have own, independent portfolios, strategies and operation.

Durrant pointed out however that some Android devices have significant infringement issues of Nokia patents. Google already complained to the European Commission, claiming that Microsoft and Nokia transferred 1,200 patents to patent troll MOSAID.

With the company going through one of the worst, if not the words, times in history of the company, its patents have turned out to be quite a lucrative business. Namely, the company earns about €500 million/$618 million annually from mobile telephony patents.

Apparently, some analysts claim that a more serious patent rights management could significantly increase these figures even further. Yaay, who needs phones and innovation when you have such delicious patent wars?

More here.


Last modified on Friday, 01 June 2012 13:49
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