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Monday, 18 June 2012 10:48

Lazy lawyers use robots to sue file sharers

Written by Nick Farrell



If you would like to pay press button one


Prenda Law, a firm hired by porn companies, has been relying on robocalls to inform people on the start of a lawsuit.

According to Dietrolldie filesharers are run up by a robot who claims to be someone from Prenda Law. It said that the file sharer had ignored the company's offer to settle being expired now for more than 30 days it is pretty clear to them that you don’t plan to enter into a settlement agreement with them.

Basically the call tells the file sharer about the court process but it is also a last minute pressure to get the person to pay up. The whole thing is dodgy. In some states, robocalls are considered illegal. If a defendant hires an laywer, the plaintiff is not allowed to contact him directly.

The tactic could also be considered unethical as it violates, among others, the Illinois Registration and Disciplinary Commission’s Rules of Professional Conduct because the robot could be seen as giving legal advice to an unrepresented person.

Nick Farrell

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