Featured Articles

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

Apple is dancing the same dance year after year. It releases the iPhone and two days before they start shipping it…

More...
Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon has just released three new tablets starting with the $99 priced 6-inch Kindle Fire HD6. This is a 6-inch tablet…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 19 June 2012 10:06

AMD’s 2013 lineup to rely on bulk 28nm process

Written by Peter Scott



So long SOI, you served us well


AMD will complete its transition to bulk manufacturing in 2013. This will mark the end of the road for Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology, which served AMD quite well for years.

AMD CTO Mark Papermaster confirmed that the company will shift to 28nm bulk CMOS process next year and SOI will become a thing of the past. However, AMD will apparently make no changes in GPU processes and it will continue to use TSMC’s 28nm process.

So, next generation AMD graphics, codenamed Sea Islands, should enter production using the same process toward the end of the year. So, rumours that GlobalFoundries might get a piece of the cake did not pan out. However, GlobalFoundries should start churning out 28nm chips nonetheless and we are not only talking about AMD designs.

And now for some nostalgia. AMD first used SOI on some of its most successful processors nearly a decade ago, namely Athlon 64 series parts which gave Intel chips of the day a run for their money. Sadly, the good days are long gone and at the moment AMD does not have any high-end chips that can go toe to toe with Intel’s Ivy Bridge parts.

More here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 20 June 2012 09:26
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments