Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 19 June 2012 14:52

Amsterdam data centre cools with groundwater

Written by Nick Farrell

y exclamation

They have a lot of water in Holland


A data
centre company has worked out a way to use the fact that a lot of Holland is technically under sea level and periodically requires small boys to save the country by sticking their hands in dykes.

Aelecity Group is using innovative technology in its new Amsterdam data centre, Southeast AMS 5. The site will utilize one of the largest installations of an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) system which will significantly improve the efficiency of the facility's cooling capabilities, and contribute to the data centre's industry-leading environmental performance.

ATES is a thermal technology which utilizes the naturally stored groundwater found in Amsterdam. The system works in harmony with the seasons by storing water in underground wells which is warmed by waste heat from the data centre in the summer and cooled by the lower external temperatures in the winter.

The cool water is stored in the ground and is then used in summer as a part of the cooling process. Alexandra Schless, Managing Director, TelecityGroup Netherlands said that while ATES systems are used widely across the Netherlands, the technology has never been rolled out before on such a large data centre project.


Last modified on Tuesday, 19 June 2012 18:06

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments