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Tuesday, 19 June 2012 14:52

Amsterdam data centre cools with groundwater

Written by Nick Farrell

y exclamation

They have a lot of water in Holland


A data
centre company has worked out a way to use the fact that a lot of Holland is technically under sea level and periodically requires small boys to save the country by sticking their hands in dykes.

Aelecity Group is using innovative technology in its new Amsterdam data centre, Southeast AMS 5. The site will utilize one of the largest installations of an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) system which will significantly improve the efficiency of the facility's cooling capabilities, and contribute to the data centre's industry-leading environmental performance.

ATES is a thermal technology which utilizes the naturally stored groundwater found in Amsterdam. The system works in harmony with the seasons by storing water in underground wells which is warmed by waste heat from the data centre in the summer and cooled by the lower external temperatures in the winter.

The cool water is stored in the ground and is then used in summer as a part of the cooling process. Alexandra Schless, Managing Director, TelecityGroup Netherlands said that while ATES systems are used widely across the Netherlands, the technology has never been rolled out before on such a large data centre project.


Last modified on Tuesday, 19 June 2012 18:06

Nick Farrell

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