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Wednesday, 20 June 2012 15:33

US and Israel behind Flame

Written by Nick Farrell



Washington Post claims to have found the smoking gun


While the US has admitted that it developed the Flame Malware and Israel has hinted at its involvement, both nations were involved according to the Washington Post.

It quoted unnamed "Western officials with knowledge of the effort" as its sources so it must be true. The malware was discovered after the UN noticed data disappearing from PCs in the Middle East. The Post claimed the US National Security Agency, the CIA and Israel's military had collaborated on the project.

A "former high-ranking US intelligence official", who it said had spoken on the condition of anonymity, told the Washington Post: Flame was about preparing the battlefield for another type of covert action. The plan was to slow Iran's nuclear program, reduce the pressure for a conventional military attack and extend the timetable for diplomacy and sanctions.

Flame was first noticed when Iran's servers were taken offline in April following a malware attack on key oil terminals. Kaspersky Labs said there had been 189 attacks in Iran, 98 in Israel and Palestine, and 32 in Sudan.


Nick Farrell

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