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Thursday, 21 June 2012 12:12

Microsoft snubs Motorola

Written by Nick Farrell



Will not smoke peace pipe


Microsoft has brushed off an offer by Motorola to bury the hatchet over patent disputes. The move threatens to halt imports of Android devices and Xbox game consoles into the United States.

The patents at issue relate to Microsoft technology called ActiveSync, which updates calendars automatically on some Android phones. Microsoft is demanding royalties from all companies using Google's Android system in their devices. Only Motorola has told it to go forth and multiply. Motorola is demanding royalties on some of its own video and wireless technology used in Microsoft's Xbox game console and the Windows operating system.

Vole claims that Motorola still wants a lot of dosh for its settlement and it does not want to pay. Motorola has offered to pay Microsoft 33 cents for each Android phone using ActiveSync, and asked for a royalty of 2.25 percent on each Xbox and 50 cents per copy of Windows for using its patents.

Last month the International Trade Commission recommended an import ban on infringing Android devices and Xbox consoles unless the patent issues were settled.


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