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Friday, 18 April 2008 10:28

Silicon to be replaced by pencils

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Technologies change


Boffins have decided that Silicon has had its day and transistors will eventually be replaced by Graphene.

According to the BBC, researchers have built the world's smallest transistor, an atom thick and 10 atoms wide, out of the material which is the same as what you have in a pencil.

Dr, Kostya Novoselov and Professor Andre Geim from The School of Physics and Astronomy at The University of Manchester think graphene is a super material because it is flat, stable, and transparent.

Novoselov and Geim found that graphene can be carved into tiny electronic circuits with individual transistors not much larger than a molecule. It could conduct electricity faster and further. It also works at room temperature.

More here.

Last modified on Friday, 18 April 2008 15:55

Nick Farell

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