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Wednesday, 27 June 2012 09:11

High pricing remains a concern for ultrabook vendors

Written by Fudzilla staff

Acer downgrades sales forecast

As second generation ultrabooks powered by Ivy Bridge chips enter the fray, it appears that vendors are struggling to reduce prices in accordance with Intel’s plans.

The idea was to launch the first $799 ultrabooks in Q3 2012, but Digitimes claims many vendors are having quite a bit of trouble cutting their production costs. Basically costs of essential components such as SSDs, screen panels, processors and batteries have not dropped and they are not expected to, either.

However, with current costs vendors are practically unable to drop prices and sources have told Digitimes that retail prices of second-generation entry level ultrabooks will exceed $859, while mainstream models will retail for $999 or more. Intel still believes that $699 ultrabooks will launch in the latter half of the year.

However, even some vendors don’t seem to be overly optimistic. Acer EMEA President Oliver Ahrens told the Register that the outfit has slashed its sales forecasts in Europe, in large part due to high pricing, but also due to form factor restrictions, as Europeans don’t seem to keen on 13-inchers. 

Not that long ago, Acer expected ultrabooks to make up between 25 and 35 percent of its worldwide notebook sales by the end of 2012. However, Ahrens now believes ultrabooks will account for about 10 percent of Acer’s sales, or maybe “a bit more.”


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