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Thursday, 28 June 2012 09:29

Moles leak Samsung, LG Display panel tech secrets

Written by Peter Scott



Sold to the highest bidder?


Key technology used by Samsung and LG in the production of display panels has been leaked by a subcontractor, supposedly a Chinese display manufacturer.

South Korean authorities arrested and indicted three Korean workers at the Korean branch of Orbotech. The workers are charged with leaking LG Display and Samsung Mobile Display technology.

The technologies in question are related to Samsung’s AMOLED and WOLED displays. The culprits managed to get their hands on some juicy circuit diagrams, which were designated “core national industrial technology” by Korean authorities. Orbotech’s Korean branch was also indicted.

The workers apparently stole the technology by saving it on USB drives that looked like credit cards. A prosecutor told the Korean Times that they filmed diagrams for 55-inch panel production, which aren’t on the market yet.

“They then saved the information on the USBs, which they hid in their shoes, belts or wallets,” the prosecutor said.

Authorities believe it is very likely that rival foreign companies obtained the technology through the subcontractor and that the leak could cause "a great economic blow to the nation."

More here.



Peter Scott

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