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Thursday, 28 June 2012 12:24

Intel wades into Kodak patent row

Written by Nick Farrell



Joins big names


Chipzilla has joined big names like Ricoh, Nikon, Motorola and Apple in opposing Eastman Kodak’s plan to sell digital-imaging patents at an auction in August.

Kodak, which is in receivership, filed court papers this month to set up procedures for what it calls a “flexible, competitive sale process” culminating in an auction. But the technology companies filed papers on June 25 objecting to key aspects of the proposed sale. The companies object to selling the technology if the bankruptcy court simultaneously extinguishes licenses they signed with Kodak for the use of patents.

They are concerned that the sale can eradicate their rights and defences with regard to the technology. Motorola said that the bankruptcy court shouldn’t allow the technology to be sold with the proceeds placed in escrow, for later allocation among those claiming an interest.  Motorola said it “cannot be compelled to accept money satisfaction” in place of rights under patent licenses.

Nick Farrell

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