Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 28 June 2012 12:24

Intel wades into Kodak patent row

Written by Nick Farrell



Joins big names


Chipzilla has joined big names like Ricoh, Nikon, Motorola and Apple in opposing Eastman Kodak’s plan to sell digital-imaging patents at an auction in August.

Kodak, which is in receivership, filed court papers this month to set up procedures for what it calls a “flexible, competitive sale process” culminating in an auction. But the technology companies filed papers on June 25 objecting to key aspects of the proposed sale. The companies object to selling the technology if the bankruptcy court simultaneously extinguishes licenses they signed with Kodak for the use of patents.

They are concerned that the sale can eradicate their rights and defences with regard to the technology. Motorola said that the bankruptcy court shouldn’t allow the technology to be sold with the proceeds placed in escrow, for later allocation among those claiming an interest.  Motorola said it “cannot be compelled to accept money satisfaction” in place of rights under patent licenses.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments