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Thursday, 05 July 2012 09:25

Verizon claims the right to throttle

Written by Nick Farrell



It is in the constitution


While the US was celebrating its French-backed terrorist coup against its lawful government, and replacement with a corporate oligarchy, telco Verzon was claiming that the constitution gave it the right to throttle its customers bandwidth.

Verizon is appealing against the Federal Communications Commission's new network neutrality rules. It has told the United States Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit that the FCC's new rules not only exceeded the agency's regulatory authority, but also violated network owners' constitutional rights.

Verizon thinks that the First Amendment, which is the right to freedom of speech and its property rights under the Fifth Amendment are violated by the law. It said that broadband networks are the modern-day microphone by which their owners engage in First Amendment speech.

Verizon believes that it's entitled to the same kind of control over the content that flows through its network as newspaper editors exercise over what appears in their papers. That includes the right to prioritise its own content, or those of its partners, over other Internet traffic.

So it is Verizon's right to to trample your right for free speech. I bet the US is really missing George III.

Nick Farrell

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