Featured Articles

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel releases tiny 3G cell modem

Intel has released a 3G cellular modem with an integrated power amplifier that fits into a 300 mm2 footprint, claiming it…

More...
Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

Braswell 14nm Atom slips to Q2 15

It's not all rosy in the house of Intel. It seems that upcoming Atom out-of-order cores might be giving this semiconductor…

More...
TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC 16nm wafers coming in Q1 2015

TSMC will start producing 16nm wafers in the first quarter of 2015. Sometime in the second quarter production should ramp up…

More...
Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S LGA is 35W to 95W TDP part

Skylake-S is the ‘tock’ of the Haswell architecture and despite being delayed from the original plan, this desktop part is scheduled…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 10 July 2012 07:32

British judge rules Samsung tablet is uncool

Written by Peter Scott



Also it does not infringe Apple patents


A British judge has ruled that Samsung’s Galaxy Tab does not infringe Apple’s intellectual property, but the ruling was not all good news for Samsung, as the court did not seem to impressed by Samsung's gear.

High Court judge Colin Birss told the court that Galaxy tablets lack the same understated simplicity which is the hallmark of Apple’s iPad. “They are not as cool,” he said.

Samsung welcomed the ruling, saying it affirms the company’s claims that Galaxy Tab products do not infringe Apple’s registered design rights.

“Should Apple continue to make excessive legal claims in other countries based on such generic designs, innovation in the industry could be harmed and consumer choice unduly limited,” Samsung reps told the Wall Street Journal.

This is the second legal setback for Apple in Britain in as many weeks. Last week a court ruled that HTC did not infringe Apple’s slide-to-unlock patent, as it was simply too obvious to be patented in the first place.

Apple still claims Samsung is mooching off its success and ripping off its ideas, although the courts seem less inclined to back Apple’s complaints which are slowly turning into frivolous suits.

More here.




blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments