Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 10 July 2012 10:40

Researchers develop a GPS free navigation system

Written by Nick Farrell



Just after the EU invested a fortune in Galileo


A team of Finnish researchers has created an indoor navigation system (IPS) that uses the Earth’s innate magnetic field to ascertain your position.

According to IndoorAtlas, the company spun off by the university to market and sell the technology, its system has an accuracy of between 0.1 and 2 meters. The system is based on the idea that every part of the Earth emits a magnetic field which gets modulated by man-made concrete and steel structures.

If you can map of these magnetic fields, accurate navigation is simple.  All you need to do is make a magnetic field map and navigate it with a smartphone. The company says that most smartphones ship with a built-in magnetometer which are sensitive enough to create magnetic field maps that have an accuracy of 10 centimeters. It seems to only work on built up areas and around museums. Although with the right extensive mapping it could be used on a larger scale. Who would have predicted Google Maps a few years ago?


Last modified on Tuesday, 10 July 2012 12:07

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments