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Tuesday, 24 July 2012 11:27

Clumsy Brits cost business a billion a year

Written by Nick Farrell



Electronic gear gets broken too easily


Research carried out in the UK has shown that Britain’s businesses are spending more than £1billion a year on replacing electronic devices broken by clumsy staff members.

Research by Plastic Logic, the recognised leader in the field of plastic electronics, has found that one in four employees has accidentally damaged an electronic device at work. Smartphones are the most likely to be broken, accounting for 63  per cent of damaged devices. Although people handing me an iPhone often find it is broken when it is returned.

Tablet PCs fare slightly better in the workplace, making up just a tenth percent of accidental damage.  We noted that 40 per cent of iPads survive being handled by Nick Farrell depending on whether the floor is carpeted or not. Most damage to devices is caused by  workers accidentally dropping them. A quarter of electronic devices are broken in this way. Some 14 per cent of devices are left in pieces by clumsy workers sitting on them by mistake.

One in ten devices strangely cease to work after having liquid spilt on it in the office. IT workers and engineers who cause the most damage to their technology, with more than a quarter of people working in this sector saying they have accidentally cracked the screen of their smartphone.

Nick Farrell

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