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Monday, 30 July 2012 08:46

Overclocking already OCed Nvidia cards might void warranty

Written by Fuad Abazovic



Nvidia warns partners


Our industry sources have shared with us an interesting tidbit. Overclocking your already overclock card might void the warranty, at least for AIBs toward Nvidia. Nvidia has warned a few partners that over-voltaging cards such as GTX 680 OC will results via warranty void from Nvidia to a partner who overvoltage the card.

Nvidia has a series of tests that they ask every overclock loving AIB to pass and you cannot deviate from TDP, noise and power numbers prescribed by Nvidia. This is not surprising, but with these limitations Nvidia is now telling everyone that overclocking your already overclocked GTX 680 over 1100MHz will void the warranty.

It is not clear if this immediately affects the end users but you can imagine that if Nvidia voids a warranty to an AIB partner you purchased your card from, it will probably backfire on the end user who might also be affected.

It remains to be seen what happens if you buy a card clocked to 1100MHz and you push it to 1200MHz and fry it in the process, if Nvidia will accept the warranty as according to this information we’ve received it won’t.

For Nvidia it’s all about cutting the cost and saying no to any RMA that it can avoid, as this cost the company the money. We are just amazed that company that built up a lot of its success on high performance overclocking parts simply refuses to learn from the past. Going against high-end, power users is never a good strategy as these guys affect a lot of potential sales.

We will be happy to post a follow up in case Nvidia or any of the partners officially respond.

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