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Tuesday, 31 July 2012 11:46

RIAA knew SOPA was a waste of space

Written by Nick Farrell



But defended it anyway


The RIAA’s public support of the SOPA and PIPA bills last year took place even though the Big Content trade group did not  believe that either piece of legislation would have put a dent in music piracy.

Torrent Freak got its paws on a leaked presentation given by RIAA Deputy General Counsel Vicky Sheckler last April. One of the bullet points had a statement that while SOPA and PIPA laws were “intended to defer infringements from foreign sites by obligating/encouraging intermediaries to take action,” they were “not likely to have been an effective tool for music.”

So it looks like Big Content was not really mourning the failure of the two draconian laws. It is now concentrating on getting a six strikes law in the US. 

“Evidence exists that most users would modify their behavior if alerted to the risks associated with using certain P2P services and/or made to believe they will face consequences if caught infringing,” Sheckler said..

Nick Farrell

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