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Thursday, 23 August 2012 10:14

DRM never stopped piracy

Written by Nick Farrell



Ubisoft claims crippling rates of theft

Ubisoft, the software house famous for miffing its users with god-awful DRM software is claiming some amazing statistics which proves how useless it is.

Ubisoft boss Yves Guillemot claims that his company has “93-95% piracy” rates. Now while most people believe this figure is made up, it does pour iced water on Ubisoft's claim that its DRM is the best way to combat piracy. Anyway he is using this figure to justify moving to F2P models. Guillemot said that only five to seven per cent of people ever fork out cash for the F2P models that are out there.

But those who do, keep on paying, which makes the more money for the F2Ping company in the long run. Thus making the F2P model more financially effective. 

However he does seem to have spoilt his argument by claiming that piracy rates are 95 per cent. If that were the case, why hack off existing users by saddling with with DRM from hell?

Nick Farrell

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