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Thursday, 06 September 2012 09:22

Ubisoft kills always on DRM

Written by Nick Farrell

ubisoft logo

Wakes up and smells the coffee

Ubisoft has decided that it will no longer use their controversial “always-on” DRM.

Apparently they scrapped in months ago and forgot to tell anyone, but from now on it will only require a single online activation after installing, with no activation limits, nor limits on how many PCs it may be activated.

Ubisoft’s worldwide director for online games, Stephanie Perotti said that the company listened to the feedback and decided that DRM was not worth the flaming. The method did not allow launching games without an internet connection, and if your connection dropped at any point, the game would instantly stop, often losing progress you may have made.

Until now Ubisoft seemed clutching on to its DRM for dear life which is why the climb down is a little odd. The company has also made some historically silly comments about software piracy, which it has never really quantified.
Still it is good news for users and maybe some other publishing houses will also wake up and smell the coffee.

More here.


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