Featured Articles

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 21 September 2012 11:15

US appeals court tells Facebook to pay up

Written by Nick Farrell



Beacon service violated privacy


A U.S. appeals court refused to disturb Facebook Inc's $9.5 million class action settlement over allegations that the social networking company's defunct "Beacon" service.

The 2-1 ruling on Thursday came from the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals, with the one dissenting judge saying the settlement unfairly benefited Facebook and plaintiff attorneys. Beacon was launched in 2007 and it allowed users to broadcast their Internet activity to friends.

Facebook didn't require anyone's affirmative consent to participate in the programme, and users soon complained about their private information being transmitted without permission. Facebook pulled the service but 19 plaintiffs filed a proposed class action in federal court against Facebook and other businesses who participated in Beacon. Facebook soon agreed to settle the case for $9.5 million.

About $3 million of that was set aside for attorney's fees, with the rest going to establish a charitable group focused on online privacy rights. However some of the plaintiffs objected to the settlement thinking it was too low, but in its ruling the 9th Circuit said $9.5 million was about right.

Facebook deputy general counsel Colin Stretch said the company was pleased the 9th Circuit found the settlement fair.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments