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Monday, 01 October 2012 09:35

Apple and Microsoft forced to appear in Aussie inquiry

Written by Nick Farrell

applemicrosoft logonew

Why are you drongos overcharging?


Executives from Apple and Microsoft are being hauled before an Aussie parliamentary inquiry to explain why they are charging that nation's users more than the rest of the world. Since the pair did not appear willingly, the federal parliamentary inquiry had to subpoena them.

Committee members say they are fed up with being ignored by one of the key players. Sydney Labor MP and committee member Ed Husic told The Sun-Herald said that the only way to get answers from some of major IT vendors is to compel them to appear before the inquiry.

He said that the committee had been sending countless letters trying to get them to either appear or substantiate their statements and has little to show for that effort. Instead of co-operating or reducing their prices, these firms have spent more money on lawyers and lobbyists working overtime to frustrate the inquiry.

Microsoft and Adobe provided submissions to the inquiry. Apple provided the committee with a confidential submission, which means it is unable to use the information in its report.

Members of the House of Representatives standing committee on infrastructure and communications have been particularly frustrated by the behaviour of Apple, which has appeared before United States congressional hearings. Husic said it seems multinational IT firms believe they're above parliamentary questioning.

Some IT-related products sell in Australia for as much as 50 per cent more than the same products in the US.

More here.

Last modified on Monday, 01 October 2012 10:07
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