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Wednesday, 17 October 2012 09:36

Huawei does not expect things to get worse

Written by Nick Farrell



US Congress expected to wade into it now


Huawei said that a US congressional committee probe into whether its access to communications infrastructure poses a security risk is unlikely to affect its businesses in other overseas markets.

The House of Representatives' Intelligence Committee issued a report earlier this month telling US companies to stop doing business with Huawei and ZTE. Canada and Britain are currently looking into similar issues, sparking concerns that it could affect Huawei's business in other markets.

Huawei's Senior Vice President Zhang Chunxiang told Reuters that it was unlikely if other overseas business would be hit. Zhang said both sides were still talking and that the US investigation was a sign of trade protectionism rather than any real security concerns.

The US investigated for 11 months and they didn't look at the material supplied by Huawei and they still came to that conclusion. A staff member of the House of Representatives Intelligence Committee said the panel has been receiving "dozens and dozens" of calls from current and former employees and customers reporting supposedly suspicious equipment behaviour, chiefly involving Huawei.

The US is a small part of Huawei's operations. The bulk of its sales in the Land of the Free come from mobile phones.

More here.

Nick Farrell

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