Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 08 November 2012 10:23

Apple gets into patent hotwater

Written by Nick Farrell



We ignore others patents, court told


Apple's engineers appear to have a policy of ignoring other people's patents when they develop “new” ideas.

The evidence came out in the case of VirnetX versus Apple, where Jobs Mob engineers admitted that they did not check if any patents existed for the technology they thought they had created. Apple had to pay $368m after a court ruled FaceTime video calls infringed VirnetX's patents.

The jury, which had sat through the five-day trial, ruled that Apple infringed two patents: one for a method of creating a virtual private network (VPN) between computers, and another for solving DNS security issues. Most of the case was about FaceTime, which lets users of Mac computers, iPhones, iPods and iPads talk to each other about their favourite Coldplay singles in real time.

Apple dealt with the VirnetX complaint by ignoring it. Doug Cawley, a lawyer at McKool Smith, said Apple insisted that it did not infringe. But Apple developers testified that they didn’t pay any attention to anyone’s patents when developing their system.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments