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Wednesday, 14 November 2012 10:11

US goes on witch hunt for Chinese

Written by Nick Farrell



McCarthy rises from dead


The US government has reverted to its old witch-hunting ways as starts to launch a McCarthy style commission into Chinese cyberspying.

Recommendations by the bipartisan U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission reflect its stated concern that China has become "the most threatening actor in cyberspace." We would have thought that title would have belonged to Jack Nicholson who can be threatening in any space.

The commission said the most notable trend in Chinese cyber-spying over the past year had been "increasingly creative and resourceful targeting" across government, industry and civil society. The report included 32 recommendations for congress action on ties between the United States and China.  It did not mention getting together a mob armed with torches and pitchforks, but it might have well.

The commission said Congress should consider tougher screening laws for investments made by China's state-owned enterprises because of their allegedly unfairly subsidised challenges to US corporate competitors. Of course it did not mention how US corporate interests gained advantage over Chinese competition by bribing politicians.

The report moaned that US companies lag in their ability to deal effectively with the growing sophistication of Chinese computer-launched spying.

Nick Farrell

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