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Thursday, 15 November 2012 10:50

Adobe confirms database hack

Written by Nick Farrell



SQL injection exploit used


Adobe has confirmed that one of its databases was hacked and it had temporarily taken offline the Connectusers.com website which was hit.

The hacker told Dark Reading he used a SQL injection exploit in the breach. The hacker comes from Egypt hacker and goes by the handle "ViruS_HimA." He said he dumped a database of 150,000 emails and passwords of Adobe customers and partners. The affected accounts include Adobe employees, US military users including US Air Force users, and users from Google, NASA, universities, and other companies.

The hacker said it was a SQL Injection vulnerability which allowed him to dump the database in less requests than normal people do. He said that users passwords for the Adobe Connect users site were stored and hashed with MD5, he says, which made them "easy to crack" with freely available tools. ViruS_HimA leaked only some of the affected emails, including some from @ "adobe.com", "*.mil", and "*.gov," with a screen shot in his Pastebin post.

He said he only did that because Adobe was slow to respond to vulnerability disclosures and fixes. ViruS_HimA  moaned that Adobe was a  big company but they don't really take care of them security issues, When someone report vulnerability to them, It take five to seven days for the notification that they've received your report.  The four months it takes to to patch the vulnerabilities is too long.

Nick Farrell

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