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Monday, 17 December 2012 11:08

Google UK apologizes for botched Nexus 4 launch

Written by Peter Scott

Proving once again that Brits have manners

It’s been over a month since Google introduced the Nexus 4, yet the much coveted flagship is practically nowhere to be seen. It is still all but impossible to get in most parts of the world.

Cue Dan Cobley, managing director of Google UK and Google Ireland. Cobley issued a statement over the weekend, apologizing to consumers who rushed to buy the new Nexus, only to find it unavailable.

“We are all working through the nights and weekends to resolve this issue. Supplies from the manufacturer are scarce and erratic, and our communication has been flawed. I can offer an unreserved apology for our service and communication failures in this process,” said Cobley.

It sounds like Google is trying to pin part of the blame on LG, and considering the scale of the issue it’s more than likely that both outfits didn’t do their homework. Although it is comforting to hear any sort of apology, it won’t make the issue go away.

It is becoming increasingly evident that Google grossly underestimated demand and even if LG needs to share the blame, why should consumers care? We don’t hear Apple moaning about Foxconn missing its targets and running into production issues, do we?

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