Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 17 December 2012 11:28

UCLA researchers come up with new energy efficient memory

Written by Peter Scott

MeRAM is the name


A team of UCLA researchers has come up with a new memory technology, a twist on magnetoresistive RAM, or MRAM.

UCLA calls its new tech magnetoelectric RAM, or MeRAM. MeRAM’s key advantage over existing memory technologies is that it combines very low energy with high density, which translates into high speed. MeRAM is somewhat similar to traditional flash memory, but it’s much faster.

Current magnetic memory is based on spin-transfer torque technology, or STT, and it utilizes an electric current to write data. However, it also comes with some limitations, i.e. it generates a lot of heat, thus limiting density and jacking up costs.

MeRAM uses voltage rather than electric current, so it can operate less power and heat. It is 10 to 1,000 times more energy efficient than existing technologies.

It sounds like a great choice for smartphones and tablets, but when can we expect MeRAM to actually roll out? Well the research paper was presented on December 12 and the technology still has some teething problems, so it could be years before we see it in actual products.

More here.

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments