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Wednesday, 26 December 2012 12:12

Don’t listen to Chinese adverts

Written by Nick Farrell



Bloke finds out they are accurate as fortune cookies


A Chinese bloke who was looking for a cheap deal on a tablet computer, made the fatal mistake of buying one he saw on an infomercial on one of China's state China Central Television stations.

After all the Government owns the channel, and the government is supposed to protect people from snake oil sellers, right? Zhang (surname only) of Haikou city decided to buy a tablet which was supposed to have free wireless internet, the ability to make phone calls, GPS navigation and various other "smart" features all for the price of $111. It even had a local celebrity saying that if the tablet was unsatisfactory, it could be returned for a full refund.

After waiting a few days, Zhang's package arrived and the only thing it could do was play very simple games. Zhang called the company to get his full refund but could not find a customer service agent. After countless calls he finally found the company and they agreed to exchange his "tablet" with the real deal citing a shipping error.

After waiting a little while Zhang received a box full of lottery tickets and a slip saying he needed to pay another $90 to get his tablet. He told local media that he has given up, but recommends that you no longer trust the government when it comes to protecting you from dodgy tablet sellers.

Nick Farrell

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