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Thursday, 17 January 2013 10:53

Plusnet tests sharing IP addresses

Written by Nick Farrell



Big Content will not like this


A UK ISP, PlusNet, is testing a new scheme in which all its customers could share one IP address through Carrier Grade NAT (CGNAT). It claims that the move has been made necessary by the slow progress of IPv6, and it could hack off users and big content at the same time.

Firstly it might limit customers’ Internet actions, but on the plus side it will prevent Big Content or law enforcement from tracking users. The situation has come about because IPv4 has run out of addresses and while IPv6 it is being rolled out so slowly that few are using it.

Critics claim PlusNet users cannot host content and it could cause problems with any end-to-end Internet services. However writing in a forum PlusNet’s Matt Taylor defended the decision saying that Carrier Grade NAT (CGNAT) is similar to the NAT that people use on their home routers.

Most people they will never notice, most mobile operators already use CGNAT and so most applications will just work.

Nick Farrell

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