Featured Articles

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC: Volume production of 16nm FinFET in 2H 2015

TSMC has announced that it will begin volume production of 16nm FinFET products in the second half of 2015, in late…

More...
AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD misses earnings targets, announces layoffs

AMD has missed earnings targets and is planning a substantial job cuts. The company reported quarterly earnings yesterday and the street is…

More...
Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

Did Google botch the Nexus 6 and Nexus 9?

As expected, Google has finally released the eagerly awaited Nexus 6 phablet and its first 64-bit device, the Nexus 9 tablet.

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 18 January 2013 10:50

Cisco signs up for Intel foundry

Written by Nick Farrell



Chipzilla leans on its fabs


Cisco has signed up for Intel’s fabs for its made-to-order networking chips. It means that Intel has landed its biggest customer yet for its fledgling foundry business.

Under the deal, Intel will manufacture processors designed by Cisco. Cisco already buys chips that are designed and manufactured by Intel, and the the new orders represent a vote of confidence in Intel’s expansion efforts. Intel’s push would step up pressure on TSMC as this is really jumping on its turf.

Chipzilla’s move to contract chip manufacturing might offset a slump in its main personal computer chip business. Intel, which reported lower fourth-quarter earnings, has been slowing down plants to burn off stockpiles of unused chips. The only companies that have announced plans to hire Intel to make products they design are Tabula, Achronix and Netronome.  These are small designers of programmable logic and networking chips.

Chief Executive Officer Paul Otellini has described Intel’s interest in the foundry industry as being at the first stage in a “crawl, walk, run” progression.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments