Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 25 January 2013 10:22

Apple might tap Qualcomm for cheap iPhone SoC

Written by Peter Scott



Could replace A-series SoC and discrete chips?


Rumours of a cheap iPhone for emerging markets are a seasonal affair and they seem to pop up practically every year, but this time around things could be different.

Quite a few reputable analysts now believe Apple will indeed come up with a cheaper iPhone, with a polycarbonate body and a bunch of cheaper components. But analysts from Detwiler Fenton are going a step further. They claim Apple will use a Qualcomm SoC in the new phone.

It sounds pretty plausible. Qualcomm has a wide range of top notch Snapdragon chips based on custom cores, and new parts based on Krait 300 and Krait 400 cores should appear over the next two quarters. What’s more, Apple already uses a number of Qualcomm components in the iPhone and going for a complete SoC solution would allow it to ditch consolidate three discrete chips into a single SoC, significantly cutting costs.

Detweiler believes the shift to a single Qualcomm cheap could help Apple shave off a few bucks from the BOM, while at the same time Qualcomm would get $10 to $15 per phone. Apple currently uses Qualcomm’s discrete modem in the iPhone 5, along with a Broadcom wifi/Bluetooth combo chip.

However, Apple did not use third party application processors since the introduction of the iPhone 4, based on the A4 SoC. The latest A6 generation features custom cores, much like Qualcomm’s Krait based chips, but there could be some compatibility issues. Apple’s A-series SoCs use Imagination graphics, while Snapdragons feature Adreno GPUs. The level of customization in both chips is another concern.

More here.

blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments