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Wednesday, 30 January 2013 10:33

World lets Antigua be a pirate

Written by Nick Farrell



Only way to stop US’s illegal bullying


The World Trade Organisation has agreed to let Antigua be an officially blessed pirate of movies and software. The trade body believes that it is the only way to stop the US from bullying the country into adopting its Christian fundamentalist policy on gambling.

The Bush administration brought in some laws on gambling which were part of his policy of forcing other countries to adopt the same Christian ethics standards as the Bible Belt. Apparently his moves against dancing, drinking and swearing did not go anywhere, but the laws Bush brought in against online gambling screwed up the Antiguan economy. The US did not seem to particularly care about the Antiguans. It said it would pray for them and thought they should be thankful that although they were poor, at least they were not going to hell.

The Antiguans took the matter to the World Trade Organisation, saying that such actions were completely illegal. The WTO agreed completely but could not force the fundamentalist Christian US from doing the decent thing. This was mostly because it had nukes and spent most of its cash having an army five times bigger than anyone elses. The WTO came up with a solution which is positively brilliant. Since politicians in the US are paid for by Big Content and the IT industry, and the biggest obsession these guys have is with piracy it would force them to comply by allowing Antigua to be the world’s first legal pirate.

Local authorities in Autigua can move forward with their plan to start a download portal which offers movies, music and software without compensating the American companies that make them. The Caribbean country received authorisation from the WTO to suspend U.S. copyrights during a meeting in Geneva. Antigua’s Finance Minister Harold Lovell said in a comment that the US left his Government no other option than to respond in this manner.

“These aggressive efforts to shut down the remote gaming industry in Antigua has resulted in the loss of thousands of good paying jobs and seizure by the Americans of billions of dollars belonging to gaming operators and their customers in financial institutions across the world,” Lowell says.

Ideally, Antigua hopes to settle the dispute before opening up their free media portal but there are no signs that the US is going to comply with the WTO rulings. It is more likely that the US will invade and make the island nation an official state of the US before that happens. So far the US has only warned Antigua that “Government-authorised piracy” would harm the ongoing settlement discussions. But since these are not really happening anyway, Antigua has got little to lose.

Nick Farrell

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