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Friday, 01 February 2013 11:05

CES dumps CNET

Written by Nick Farrell



You are no longer credible


One of the world’s largest computer shows has dumped CNET as a judge because it is biased in favour of Big Content. The Consumer Electronics Show has fired CNET as a judge of products at the show after the company was forced by its CBS overlords to write biased news and reviews.

CBS censored CNET's top award at CES and subsequently invented a conflict-of-interest policy based solely on the interests of CBS.  This made CNET about as credible to the IT industry as an inquiry into child sex abuse at the BBC being conducted by the ghost of Jimmy Savell. The Consumer Electronics Association has bestowed its Best in Show title upon the same Dish Network product that started this whole mess in the first place. It has also said that it will no longer work with CNET.

Karen Chupka, the CEA's senior vice president for events and conferences said that the magazine’s new review policy will have a negative impact on the show’s brand. The move is a big blow for CNET can’t really convince anyone that it is credible after it was revealed that reporters were unable to write anything that offended CBS. 

The US IT trade press has always had credibility issues.  Reporters across the pond are too often frightened to write what they really think in case they do not get press trips or nice products to review.  This situation is worse because it seems that hacks also have to take into account their owners' sensibilities too.  At this rate they will not even be allowed to cut and paste press releases without running them through a corporate lawyer first. 

Nick Farrell

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