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Tuesday, 12 February 2013 11:41

Apple and Samsung stores hit with digital graffiti

Written by Nick Farrell



Iconoclastic protests

The Friends of the Earth have used augmented reality for the first time to target Apple in the latest stage of its campaign for smartphones and other products that don’t harm people or the environment.

Activists from the environment charity have digitally tagged 12 key Apple and Samsung cathedrals to modern consumerism around the country. Smartphone users in these locations following Friends of the Earth’s channel on the free Aurasma app will see the stores enhanced by virtual graffiti, just by viewing the store front through their phone screen.

Over the store front and the iPhone signage inside all Apple stores an interactive ‘Aura’ now appears, showing a short film that reveals the devastation caused by mining tin for smartphones in Indonesia. Users can also click through to a website where they can email Apple and Samsung to ask them whether they use tin, an essential component in all electronic items, from Indonesia.

Nick Farrell

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